Happy New Year


As we begin a new decade we here at Earthtones NW are feeling grateful for you, our community. We feel honored to provide music therapy, horticultural therapy and art therapy to the Willamette Valley and beyond. Our practice is centered around building therapeutic relationships and supporting our clients. We feel such gratitude for these important relationships and want to say thank you for the opportunity to know you, and provide you with these services. If you are a case manager- we value you and are thankful for all you do. If you are someone who has chosen to receive our services we are inspired by you and overwhelmed with gratitude. If you are a family member of a client- we so appreciate getting to know you and hearing your story. If you are a facility staff member- we acknowledge your hard work and want to say thank you for supporting us and the people in your community. As we reflect on 2019 the feelings of warmth and gratitude prevail.

May your 2020 be filled with love and light!

Jodi Winnwalker, Earthtones Northwest’s CEO and owner

Earthtones NW had the honor of hosting 5 music therapy interns in 2019. Adam and Matthew graduated from our internship program in August 2019. Stephanie, Kat and Darcey are in their final month of internship and are set to graduate come end of January 2020. Chloe and Katie began their music therapy internship journey just last week. We are excited to have them as part of our team. We are grateful to work with these talented individuals and are proud of their growth and accomplishments.

We look forward to continuing to serve our community in 2020 and wish you all a year of health and wellness. For more information on Earthtones Northwest and our services explore our website at or give us a call at (503) 284-6794, we would love to hear from you.

All Classical Portland

All Classical Portland recently embarked on a month long campaign focused on music and health. As part of their efforts to highlight the incredible ways in which music heals, they invited Jodi Winnwalker, Earthtones owner and CEO, to join a panel of professionals with a live audience at the radio station.

Nancy Ive plays the Cello during the All Classical Music Heals Panel Discussion.

How music heals

On Oct 17th Jodi and Dr. Larry Sherman, Kristrun Grondal, and Nancy Ive sat down with moderator Suzanne Nance, President and CEO of All Classical, to discuss how music is utilized in therapy and medicine.

Jodi Winnwalker, Earthtones CEO and owner, Suzanne Nance, CEO of All Classical Portland, Nancy Ive, principal cellist for the Oregon Symphony, Kristen Grondal of the Maybelle Center for the Community. Not pictured: Dr. Larry Sherman professor at the Oregon Health and Science University.

“It was a privilege and delight to join a panel of well informed and dynamically engaged professionals, all committed to the use of music for health and social justice in our community.”

-Jodi Winnwalker

During the month long “Music Heals” campaign All Classical featured several local organizations whose mission supports music and health. One such feature highlighted MusicNow, a collaborative program of Earthtones Northwest and the Oregon Symphony. Maggie Johnson, Earthtones Music Therapy Program Director, was invited into the studio alongside Alicia DiDonato Paulsen, the Assistant Principal Flute for the Oregon Symphony, to talk about the unique program.

Colin Corner, principal bassist for the Oregon Symphony and Maggie Johnson, Earthtones Northwest’s Music Therapy Program Director leading a MusicNow group.

MusicNow is a one of a kind program that pairs an Oregon Symphony professional musician and a board-certified music therapist to collaborate in providing high quality music and musical experiences to groups of adults living with dementia. The result of such collaboration benefits the participants as part of a wider musical community and allows the musicians to share and witness the strength of these communities and the power of music as a way to form immediate bonds with others.

To learn more about MusicNow visit www.earthtonesnw.com or email info@earthtonesnw.com

To listen to All Classical tune into KQAC 89.9 for the Portland/Vancouver area. To see All Classical’s spotlight on Earthtones visit https://www.allclassical.org/spotlights/earthtones-northwest/ .

Senior Gardening Days

The 15th annual Senior Gardening Days was held at Portland Nursery on September 18th and October 16th 2019. Earthtones Northwest, the Portland Memory Garden, and Home Instead sponsored the lively event which provided free nature-based activities, demonstrations, and live music for older adults across the community. Despite the cooler temperatures and rain over 170 people came to immerse in the activities, shop for plants and to enjoy the lush autumn season.

Nature-based activities, music and community

Box of Chocolates, led by Reggie Houston, charmed the crowd with the sounds of jazz, blues, and old classic tunes. Community members made their way through the nursery, stopping at tables offering activities such as crocus planting, seasonal potpourii sachets, pressed leaf and flower embossing and more during the 2 hour nursery event.

Connecting with the season, self and others

Senior Gardening Days aims to provide older adults, especially those living in care facilities, a chance to get out into their community and connect with peers, plants, music, horticultural therapists and horticultural therapy students.

“this is just so wonderful, look at how beautiful it is!”

One participant said “this is just so wonderful, look at how beautiful it is!” after completing a pressed leaf arrangement. This annual event takes place every September and October. For more information on next years event, and how to RSVP please visit Portland Nurseries website.

Shake It Up! 3 Things We Love About the Tambourine

Not All Tambourines Are The Same! (1)

  1. They’re adaptable. When you put a tambourine in your hand, the jingles or “zils” practically play themselves. Most tambourines are responsive enough that they require very little movement to play and their bright sound rings through when you shake them in the music circle.
  2. They add sparkle to any song. So many great songs feature the tambourine. Check out our playlist on Spotify for some of our favorite examples. Or, we bet if you give a listen to genres such as rock or classical in your own music library, you’ll be sure to hear it!
  3. They’re easy to sanitize. Music therapists sanitize their instruments after every session.

Meet Susie Sample, Intern Horticultural Therapist

 

 

Meet Susie Sampe

 

What drew you to Horticultural Therapy?

I was drawn to the field of gerontology from helping my mom who was living with lewy body dementia. During my coursework at Portland Community College I discovered Horticultural Therapy (HT). Being a lifelong lover of plants and nature I was excited to combine these two passions. I witnessed the value of HT firsthand during an internship at an adult day center when I saw a horticultural therapy session in action. The benefits of HT were apparent and I felt like it was fulfilling a real need.

What populations do you work with?

I work with primarily older adults, many of whom have dementia. All of the adults that I work with have some form of physical or cognitive disability.

What is your favorite part about your work as a HT intern at Earthtones?

My favorite part is sharing nature and plants with people who often do not get other opportunities to engage with the outside world. Sharing these special experiences with people is so wonderful. The spark that people get in their eyes when they are directly engaging with plant material fills me with joy. Being a witness to that moment is truly an honor and I love that I get to increase this type of opportunity for them and can help to fill their basic human need of meaningful activity.

Song List Series – Songs with a Catchy Chorus

catchy-chorus

We LOVE a good chorus. It can serve many different purposes, from being a musical container while passing out/collecting instruments, to a springboard for improvisation, or even a base for songwriting! Sometimes though, you remember the chorus but not the title of the song. Well, look no further! Here is a list of 10 songs with a catchy chorus.

  1. “Kids” by MGMT
  2. “The Walker” by Fitz and the Tantrums
  3. “Hey Ya” by Outkast
  4. “Low Rider” by WAR
  5. “Don’t Worry Be Happy” by Bobby McFerrin
  6. “Shake it Off” by Taylor Swift
  7. “Stayin’ Alive” by the BeeGees
  8. “Land of 1000 Dances” by Wilson Pickett
  9. “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough”by Marvin Gaye
  10. “We Will Rock You” by Queen

Click here for this playlist on Spotify!

Earthtones Spotlight – Tonya Fisher

tonya

Tonya Fisher, MT-BC is many things. She is a genealogy enthusiast, a rock fan (both the musical and geological variety), and a karaoke champion. And if that wasn’t enough, she is a wonderful music therapist! She loaned her powerful voice and presence to Earthtones after completing her internship with us last year, and we couldn’t be happier to have her on board.

What drew you to music therapy?

I wanted to find a career that would be rewarding for me, that helped other people, and yet allowed me to make music every day. For a long time I worked in the restaurant industry and was really dissatisfied with that. It was taking a toll on my mental health AND my physical health!

How did you become a music therapist?

I was actually complaining to my therapist in a session one day about how dissatisfied I was. We were listing the qualities that other people had remarked on in regards to me, things that I had noticed, what I love to do… and she’s the one who said, “Have you ever heard of music therapy? I think you would be perfect at it!”

So then I went and did an online search for music therapy to find out what it would take to be a music therapist. I saw that, in my own backyard, there was a program at Marylhurst. I applied, and I got in!

What population do you work with?

Mostly adults with developmental disabilities and memory care.

Do you have one population in particular that resonates with you?

I love them all but I think I love memory care the most. I’m also very interest in working in the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit), although I’ve only completed the first tier in certification*.

*In order to work with this very fragile population, music therapists must undergo a 3-tier certification training.

Tell us about a typical day for you.

A typical day will have probably 3-4 sessions, and I will be in my car a lot. Depending on my day, I’m probably in the car from noon to 6:30 PM driving to and from clients! I try to plan for a week in advance, then review my plan in the morning to make sure it’s fresh. I usually do something in the evening for self-care, either writing, singing a song, doing research…

Me: Research  for self care?

Well in the evening sometimes I’ll look up something about a population I’m interested in. Like I said I want to keep it fresh, and not do the same things over and over.

After every session I jot down notes in the notebook I carry with me so I can remember the significant highlights and whether goals were met. Which makes it easier when you’re writing 15 quarterly reports!

What has surprised you the most about your work?

Just about every session I have I get to witness little minor miracles…some of them not so minor! I get to see clients with dementia who haven’t spoken in a length of time, suddenly open up and start singling. Or talking to me and having a conversation! Or persons with developmental disabilities who are nonverbal who suddenly starting singing the horn part to “I Feel Good!” [by James Brown] *She sings it and shimmies, before bursting out laughing*

Just, the happiness I have now. I can’t describe it. It’s not work, it’s magic!

Who has influenced you?

There is a myriad of female music therapists in the Portland that have influenced me. Jodi Winnwalker, Laura Beer, Chris Korb, Liska McNally, Emily Ross, Beth Rousseau, Jessica Western…
Another mentor of mine is [Earthtones music therapist] Ted Owen!  He’s so laid back and had such good advice for me. He takes a “Let’s just see what’s gonna happen” approach.
There are a whole bunch of people that influenced me in the field. Then other times my own family experiences will come back, like the song that I sang with grandmother or my mom. I can use my familial knowledge of their generation to connect with my clients. They influenced me too!

Favorite genre of music?

I would say probably rhythm and blues.

What about your favorite song?

Right now it’s Build Me up Buttercup!

Any advice for someone who wants to become a music therapist?

A great way to see if this might be for you is to try a job shadow. I think if I would have had a chance to do that you’ll have a good idea of what you’re getting into. Get to know your music therapy community and learn what it is that we do. Read the AMTA scope of practice. Just do your research!

Make a list of your strengths, and build on them. Know yourself: your interaction style, how you deal with stress, etc! If music is a joyful experience for you then this will probably be a joyful job for you.

If you’re someone who has had life experience and considering going back to school, it’s doable. Don’t be afraid to go back and do this if the calling is there. Don’t let age hold you back! It’s never too late to bring the joy that you deserve into your life and help others.

A Golden Moment

golden-moments

Not long ago I had a gentleman join one of my memory care groups. We can call him “John.” For the first few weeks that I saw him, John sat on the periphery of the group and declined invitations to join in. One day he was wearing an Oregon Bach Festival t-shirt, so I naturally struck up a conversation with him. John was soft spoken and kind, and from that point on we bonded easily over our mutual love for baroque music. When I brought my flute to a session and played a sonata by Handel, he lit up. After that it took very little prompting for John to make himself comfortable in the group. He played maracas and sang along to Sinatra. One afternoon John’s wife came to visit and sat in on a music therapy session. She pulled me aside afterwards and said, “I haven’t seen him like that in a very long time. You’re the only one who can reach the real John.”

 

Working as music therapists gives us a special and unique perspective. We get the gift of seeing our clients in a light that is only possible through music. If you believe in magic, this is where it happens. I feel honored to be a part of it!

Song List Series – Classic Rock Songs with Vowels in the Chorus

classic-rock-songswith

This may seem like an oddly specific sub-genre, but music therapists often work with clients that have speech goals. Songs that have sustained or repeated vowels in the chorus can address breath control, word “shaping,” and even self-expression! Plus, in this day and age classic rock is an increasingly popular genre that reaches across generations.

“Who Are You” by The Who

“Jersey Girl” by Bruce Springsteen

“Brown Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison

“Livin’ on a Prayer” by Bon Jovi

“D’yer Mak’er” by Led Zeppelin

“Sweet Child of Mine” by Guns n Roses

“Take on Me” by a-ha

“Crocodile Rock” by Elton John

“Don’t Worry Be Happy” by  Bobby McFerrin

“Immigrant Song” by Led Zeppelin

“Obla Di Obla Da” by The Beatles

“Bad to the Bone” by George Thorogood

“Listen to the Music” by Doobie Brothers

“Bobby McGee” by Janis Joplin

“Judy Blue Eyes” by Crosby, Stills & Nash

Tune in next week for songs with great hooks!

Song List Series – Songs About Grief and Loss

Every so often a repertoire-related question pops up in a music therapy forum online. What follows is usually a flood of fantastic song suggestions. We thought, why not compile them? This week our theme is “Songs About Grief and Loss.”

  1. “Work Song” by Hozier
  2. “If I Ever Leave This World Alive” by Flogging Molly
  3. “St. Jude” by Florence + the Machine
  4. “Wanting Memories” by Sweet Honey in the Rock
  5. “Beam Me Up” by Pink
  6.  “Mark’s Song” by EastMountainSouth
  7. “When I See You Again” by Charlie Puth
  8. “Parting Glass” by Wailing Jennys
  9. “To Where You Are” by Josh Groban
  10. “Temporary” by John Bucchino
  11. “Brief Eternity” by Bobby McFerrin
  12. “Hey Kind Friend” by Indigo Girls
  13. “Through My Prayers” by Avett Brothers
  14. “In My Life” by The Beatles
  15. “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” by Harold Arlen (Or Israel Kamakawiwo’ole)

We also highly recommend “Heart Strings Vol. 1”, which is an album written and performed by  Willamette Valley Hospice music therapists Jillian Hicks MA MT-BC, Jessica Western MT-BC & Ivan Caluya (Music Therapy intern). It features original music by the music therapists AND songs that were written and co-written by hospice patients. You can find more info –> HERE<–

Check back next week for another list! The theme is “Classic Rock.”